Multilevel Modeling Primer in TensorFlow Probability

This example is ported from the PyMC3 example notebook A Primer on Bayesian Methods for Multilevel Modeling

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Dependencies & Prerequisites




import collections
import os
from six.moves import urllib
import daft as daft
import matplotlib as mpl
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
import seaborn as sns
import warnings

import tensorflow.compat.v2 as tf
tf.enable_v2_behavior()

import tensorflow_datasets as tfds
import tensorflow_probability as tfp

tfk = tf.keras
tfkl = tf.keras.layers
tfpl = tfp.layers
tfd = tfp.distributions
tfb = tfp.bijectors

warnings.simplefilter('ignore')

1 Introduction

In this colab we will fit hierarchical linear models (HLMs) of various degrees of model complexity using the popular Radon dataset. We will make use of TFP primitives and its Markov Chain Monte Carlo toolset.

To better fit the data, our goal is to make use of the natural hierarchical structure present in the dataset. We begin with conventional approaches: completely pooled and unpooled models. We continue with multilevel models: exploring partial pooling models, group-level predictors and contextual effects.

For a related notebook also fitting HLMs using TFP on the Radon dataset, check out Linear Mixed-Effect Regression in {TF Probability, R, Stan}.

If you have any questions about the material here, don't hesitate to contact (or join) the TensorFlow Probability mailing list. We're happy to help.

2 Multilevel Modeling Overview

A Primer on Bayesian Methods for Multilevel Modeling

Hierarchical or multilevel modeling is a generalization of regression modeling.

Multilevel models are regression models in which the constituent model parameters are given probability distributions. This implies that model parameters are allowed to vary by group. Observational units are often naturally clustered. Clustering induces dependence between observations, despite random sampling of clusters and random sampling within clusters.

A hierarchical model is a particular multilevel model where parameters are nested within one another. Some multilevel structures are not hierarchical.

e.g. "country" and "year" are not nested, but may represent separate, but overlapping, clusters of parameters We will motivate this topic using an environmental epidemiology example.

Example: Radon contamination (Gelman and Hill 2006)

Radon is a radioactive gas that enters homes through contact points with the ground. It is a carcinogen that is the primary cause of lung cancer in non-smokers. Radon levels vary greatly from household to household.

The EPA did a study of radon levels in 80,000 houses. Two important predictors are: 1. Measurement in the basement or the first floor (radon higher in basements) 2. County uranium level (positive correlation with radon levels)

We will focus on modeling radon levels in Minnesota. The hierarchy in this example is households within each county.

3 Data Munging

In this section we obtain the radon dataset and do some minimal preprocessing.

# We'll use the following directory to store files we download as well as our
# preprocessed dataset.
CACHE_DIR = os.path.join(os.sep, 'tmp', 'radon')


def cache_or_download_file(cache_dir, url_base, filename):
  """Read a cached file or download it."""
  filepath = os.path.join(cache_dir, filename)
  if tf.io.gfile.exists(filepath):
    return filepath
  if not tf.io.gfile.exists(cache_dir):
    tf.io.gfile.makedirs(cache_dir)
  url = os.path.join(url_base, filename)
  print('Downloading {url} to {filepath}.'.format(url=url, filepath=filepath))
  urllib.request.urlretrieve(url, filepath)
  return filepath


def download_radon_dataset(cache_dir=CACHE_DIR):
  """Download the radon dataset and read as Pandas dataframe."""
  url_base = 'http://www.stat.columbia.edu/~gelman/arm/examples/radon/'
  # Alternative source:
  # url_base = ('https://raw.githubusercontent.com/pymc-devs/uq_chapter/'
  #             'master/reference/data/')
  srrs2 = pd.read_csv(cache_or_download_file(cache_dir, url_base, 'srrs2.dat'))
  srrs2.rename(columns=str.strip, inplace=True)
  cty = pd.read_csv(cache_or_download_file(cache_dir, url_base, 'cty.dat'))
  cty.rename(columns=str.strip, inplace=True)
  return srrs2, cty


def preprocess_radon_dataset(srrs2, cty, state='MN'):
  """Preprocess radon dataset as done in "Bayesian Data Analysis" book."""
  srrs2 = srrs2[srrs2.state == state].copy()
  cty = cty[cty.st == state].copy()

  # We will now join datasets on Federal Information Processing Standards
  # (FIPS) id, ie, codes that link geographic units, counties and county
  # equivalents. http://jeffgill.org/Teaching/rpqm_9.pdf
  srrs2['fips'] = 1000 * srrs2.stfips + srrs2.cntyfips
  cty['fips'] = 1000 * cty.stfips + cty.ctfips

  df = srrs2.merge(cty[['fips', 'Uppm']], on='fips')
  df = df.drop_duplicates(subset='idnum')
  df = df.rename(index=str, columns={'Uppm': 'uranium_ppm'})

  # For any missing or invalid activity readings, we'll use a value of `0.1`.
  df['radon'] = df.activity.apply(lambda x: x if x > 0. else 0.1)

  # Remap categories to start from 0 and end at max(category).
  county_name = sorted(df.county.unique())
  df['county'] = df.county.astype(
      pd.api.types.CategoricalDtype(categories=county_name)).cat.codes
  county_name = list(map(str.strip, county_name))

  df['log_radon'] = df['radon'].apply(np.log)
  df['log_uranium_ppm'] = df['uranium_ppm'].apply(np.log)
  df = df[['idnum', 'log_radon', 'floor', 'county', 'log_uranium_ppm']]

  return df, county_name
radon, county_name = preprocess_radon_dataset(*download_radon_dataset())
num_counties = len(county_name)
num_observations = len(radon)
# Create copies of variables as Tensors.
county = tf.convert_to_tensor(radon['county'])
floor = tf.convert_to_tensor(radon['floor'], dtype=tf.float32)
log_radon = tf.convert_to_tensor(radon['log_radon'], dtype=tf.float32)
log_uranium = tf.convert_to_tensor(radon['log_uranium_ppm'], dtype=tf.float32)
radon.head()

Distribution of radon levels (log scale):

plt.hist(log_radon.numpy(), bins=25, edgecolor='white')
plt.xlabel("Histogram of Radon levels (Log Scale)")
plt.show()

png

4 Conventional Approaches

The two conventional alternatives to modeling radon exposure represent the two extremes of the bias-variance tradeoff:

Complete Pooling:

Treat all counties the same, and estimate a single radon level.

$$y_i = \alpha + \beta x_i + \epsilon_i$$

No Pooling:

Model radon in each county independently.

$$y_i = \alpha_{j[i]} + \beta x_i + \epsilon_i$$

where $j = 1,\ldots,85$

The errors $\epsilon_i$ may represent measurement error, temporal within-house variation, or variation among houses.


pgm = daft.PGM([7, 3.5], node_unit=1.2)
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "alpha_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        1,
        3,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "beta_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        2.5,
        3,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        4.5,
        3,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("alpha", r"$\alpha$", 1, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("beta", r"$\beta$", 2.5, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma", r"$\sigma$", 4.5, 2))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "y_i", r"$y_i \sim \mathcal{N}$", 3, 1, scale=1.25, observed=True))
pgm.add_edge("alpha_prior", "alpha")
pgm.add_edge("beta_prior", "beta")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_prior", "sigma")
pgm.add_edge("sigma", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("alpha", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("beta", "y_i")
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([2.3, 0.1, 1.4, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))

pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

Below, we fit the complete pooling model using Hamiltonian Monte Carlo.

@tf.function
def affine(x, kernel_diag, bias=tf.zeros([])):
  """`kernel_diag * x + bias` with broadcasting."""
  kernel_diag = tf.ones_like(x) * kernel_diag
  bias = tf.ones_like(x) * bias
  return x * kernel_diag + bias
def pooled_model(floor):
  """Creates a joint distribution representing our generative process."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # alpha
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # beta
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma
      lambda s, b1, b0: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # y
          loc=affine(floor, b1[..., tf.newaxis], b0[..., tf.newaxis]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=s)
  ])


@tf.function
def pooled_log_prob(alpha, beta, sigma):
  """Computes `joint_log_prob` pinned at `log_radon`."""
  return pooled_model(floor).log_prob([alpha, beta, sigma, log_radon])
@tf.function
def sample_pooled(num_chains, num_results, num_burnin_steps, num_observations):
  """Samples from the pooled model."""
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=pooled_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=10,
      step_size=0.005)

  initial_state = [
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_alpha'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_beta'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma')
  ]

  # Contrain `sigma` to the positive real axis. Other variables are
  # unconstrained.
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Identity(),  # alpha
      tfb.Identity(),  # beta
      tfb.Exp()        # sigma
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)

  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
PooledModel = collections.namedtuple('PooledModel', ['alpha', 'beta', 'sigma'])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_pooled(
    num_chains=4,
    num_results=1000,
    num_burnin_steps=1000,
    num_observations=num_observations)

print('Acceptance Probabilities for each chain: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
pooled_samples = PooledModel._make(samples)
Acceptance Probabilities for each chain:  [0.997 0.994 0.996 0.994]

for var, var_samples in pooled_samples._asdict().items():
  print('R-hat for ', var, ':\t',
        tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(var_samples).numpy())
R-hat for  alpha :   1.0050696
R-hat for  beta :    1.019694
R-hat for  sigma :   1.0004368

def reduce_samples(var_samples, reduce_fn):
  """Reduces across leading two dims using reduce_fn. """
  # Collapse the first two dimensions, typically (num_chains, num_samples), and
  # compute np.mean or np.std along the remaining axis.
  if isinstance(var_samples, tf.Tensor):
    var_samples = var_samples.numpy() # convert to numpy array
  var_samples = np.reshape(var_samples, (-1,) +  var_samples.shape[2:])
  return np.apply_along_axis(reduce_fn, axis=0, arr=var_samples)

sample_mean = lambda samples : reduce_samples(samples, np.mean)

Plot the point estimates of the slope and intercept for the complete pooling model.

LinearEstimates = collections.namedtuple('LinearEstimates',
                                        ['intercept', 'slope'])

pooled_estimate = LinearEstimates(
  intercept=sample_mean(pooled_samples.alpha),
  slope=sample_mean(pooled_samples.beta)
)

plt.scatter(radon.floor, radon.log_radon)
xvals = np.linspace(-0.2, 1.2)
plt.ylabel('Radon level (Log Scale)')
plt.xticks([0, 1], ['Basement', 'First Floor'])
plt.plot(xvals, pooled_estimate.intercept + pooled_estimate.slope * xvals, 'r--')
plt.show()

png


def plot_traces(var_name, samples, num_chains):
  if isinstance(samples, tf.Tensor):
    samples = samples.numpy() # convert to numpy array
  fig, axes = plt.subplots(1, 2, figsize=(14, 1.5), sharex='col', sharey='col')
  for chain in range(num_chains):
    axes[0].plot(samples[:, chain], alpha=0.7)
    axes[0].title.set_text("'{}' trace".format(var_name))
    sns.kdeplot(samples[:, chain], ax=axes[1], shade=False)
    axes[1].title.set_text("'{}' distribution".format(var_name))
    axes[0].set_xlabel('Iteration')
    axes[1].set_xlabel(var_name)
  plt.show()
for var, var_samples in pooled_samples._asdict().items():
  plot_traces(var, samples=var_samples, num_chains=4)

png

png

png

Next, we estimate the radon levels for each county in the unpooled model.


pgm = daft.PGM([7, 3.5], node_unit=1.2)
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "alpha_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        1,
        3,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "beta_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        2.5,
        3,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        4.5,
        3,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("alpha", r"$\alpha$", 1, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("beta", r"$\beta$", 2.5, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma", r"$\sigma$", 4.5, 2))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "y_i", r"$y_i \sim \mathcal{N}$", 3, 1, scale=1.25, observed=True))
pgm.add_edge("alpha_prior", "alpha")
pgm.add_edge("beta_prior", "beta")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_prior", "sigma")
pgm.add_edge("sigma", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("alpha", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("beta", "y_i")
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([0.3, 1.1, 1.4, 1.4], "$i = 1:85$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([2.3, 0.1, 1.4, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))

pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

def unpooled_model(floor, county):
  """Creates a joint distribution for the unpooled model."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(       # alpha
          loc=tf.zeros([num_counties]), scale_identity_multiplier=1e5),
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),    # beta
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma
      lambda s, b1, b0: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # y
          loc=affine(
            floor, b1[..., tf.newaxis], tf.gather(b0, county, axis=-1)),
          scale_identity_multiplier=s)
  ])


@tf.function
def unpooled_log_prob(beta0, beta1, sigma):
  """Computes `joint_log_prob` pinned at `log_radon`."""
  return (
    unpooled_model(floor, county).log_prob([beta0, beta1, sigma, log_radon]))
@tf.function
def sample_unpooled(num_chains, num_results, num_burnin_steps):
  """Samples from the unpooled model."""
  # Initialize the HMC transition kernel.
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=unpooled_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=10,
      step_size=0.025)

  initial_state = [
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='init_beta0'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_beta1'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma')
  ]
  # Contrain `sigma` to the positive real axis. Other variables are
  # unconstrained.
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Identity(),  # alpha
      tfb.Identity(),  # beta
      tfb.Exp()        # sigma
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)
  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
UnpooledModel = collections.namedtuple('UnpooledModel',
                                       ['alpha', 'beta', 'sigma'])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_unpooled(
    num_chains=4, num_results=1000, num_burnin_steps=1000)

print('Acceptance Probabilities: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
unpooled_samples = UnpooledModel._make(samples)

print('R-hat for beta:',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(unpooled_samples.beta).numpy())
print('R-hat for sigma:',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(unpooled_samples.sigma).numpy())
Acceptance Probabilities:  [0.88  0.902 0.897 0.905]
R-hat for beta: 1.0069175
R-hat for sigma: 1.0084022

plot_traces(var_name='beta', samples=unpooled_samples.beta, num_chains=4)
plot_traces(var_name='sigma', samples=unpooled_samples.sigma, num_chains=4)

png

png

Here are the unpooled county expected values for the intercept along with with 95% credible intervals for each chain. We also report R-hat value for each county's estimate.


def forest_plot(num_chains, num_vars, var_name, var_labels, samples):
  fig, axes = plt.subplots(
      1, 2, figsize=(12, 15), sharey=True, gridspec_kw={'width_ratios': [3, 1]})
  for var_idx in range(num_vars):
    values = samples[..., var_idx]
    rhat = tfp.mcmc.diagnostic.potential_scale_reduction(values).numpy()
    meds = np.median(values, axis=-2)
    los = np.percentile(values, 5, axis=-2)
    his = np.percentile(values, 95, axis=-2)

    for i in range(num_chains):
      height = 0.1 + 0.3 * var_idx + 0.05 * i
      axes[0].plot([los[i], his[i]], [height, height], 'C0-', lw=2, alpha=0.5)
      axes[0].plot([meds[i]], [height], 'C0o', ms=1.5)
    axes[1].plot([rhat], [height], 'C0o', ms=4)

  axes[0].set_yticks(np.arange(0.2, 26, 0.3))
  axes[0].set_ylim(0, 26)
  axes[0].grid(which='both')
  axes[0].invert_yaxis()
  axes[0].set_yticklabels(var_labels)
  axes[0].xaxis.set_label_position('top')
  axes[0].set(xlabel='95% Credible Intervals for {}'.format(var_name))

  axes[1].set_xticks([1, 2])
  axes[1].set_xlim(0.95, 2.05)
  axes[1].grid(which='both')
  axes[1].set(xlabel='R-hat')
  axes[1].xaxis.set_label_position('top')

  plt.show()
forest_plot(
    num_chains=4,
    num_vars=num_counties,
    var_name='alpha',
    var_labels=county_name,
    samples=unpooled_samples.alpha.numpy())

png

We can plot the ordered estimates to identify counties with high radon levels:

unpooled_intercepts = reduce_samples(unpooled_samples.alpha, np.mean)
unpooled_intercepts_se = reduce_samples(unpooled_samples.alpha, np.std)

def plot_ordered_estimates():
  means = pd.Series(unpooled_intercepts, index=county_name)
  std_errors = pd.Series(unpooled_intercepts_se, index=county_name)
  order = means.sort_values().index

  plt.plot(range(num_counties), means[order], '.')
  for i, m, se in zip(range(num_counties), means[order], std_errors[order]):
    plt.plot([i, i], [m - se, m + se], 'C0-')
  plt.xlabel('Ordered county')
  plt.ylabel('Radon estimate')
  plt.show()

plot_ordered_estimates()

png


def plot_estimates(linear_estimates, labels, sample_counties):
  fig, axes = plt.subplots(2, 4, figsize=(12, 6), sharey=True, sharex=True)
  axes = axes.ravel()
  intercepts_indexed = []
  slopes_indexed = []
  for intercepts, slopes in linear_estimates:
    intercepts_indexed.append(pd.Series(intercepts, index=county_name))
    slopes_indexed.append(pd.Series(slopes, index=county_name))

  markers = ['-', 'r--', 'k:']
  sample_county_codes = [county_name.index(c) for c in sample_counties]
  for i, c in enumerate(sample_county_codes):
    y = radon.log_radon[radon.county == c]
    x = radon.floor[radon.county == c]
    axes[i].scatter(
        x + np.random.randn(len(x)) * 0.01, y, alpha=0.4, label='Log Radon')

    # Plot both models and data
    xvals = np.linspace(-0.2, 1.2)
    for k in range(len(intercepts_indexed)):
      axes[i].plot(
          xvals,
          intercepts_indexed[k][c] + slopes_indexed[k][c] * xvals,
          markers[k],
          label=labels[k])

    axes[i].set_xticks([0, 1])
    axes[i].set_xticklabels(['Basement', 'First Floor'])
    axes[i].set_ylim(-1, 3)
    axes[i].set_title(sample_counties[i])
    if not i % 2:
      axes[i].set_ylabel('Log Radon level')
  axes[3].legend(bbox_to_anchor=(1.05, 0.9), borderaxespad=0.)

  plt.show()

Here are visual comparisons between the pooled and unpooled estimates for a subset of counties representing a range of sample sizes.

unpooled_estimates = LinearEstimates(
  sample_mean(unpooled_samples.alpha),
  sample_mean(unpooled_samples.beta)
)

sample_counties = ('LAC QUI PARLE', 'AITKIN', 'KOOCHICHING', 'DOUGLAS', 'CLAY',
                   'STEARNS', 'RAMSEY', 'ST LOUIS')
plot_estimates(
    linear_estimates=[unpooled_estimates, pooled_estimate],
    labels=['Unpooled Estimates', 'Pooled Estimates'],
    sample_counties=sample_counties)

png

Neither of these models are satisfactory:

  • if we are trying to identify high-radon counties, pooling is not useful.
  • we do not trust extreme unpooled estimates produced by models using few observations.

5 Multilevel and Hierarchical models

When we pool our data, we lose the information that different data points came from different counties. This means that each radon-level observation is sampled from the same probability distribution. Such a model fails to learn any variation in the sampling unit that is inherent within a group (e.g. a county). It only accounts for sampling variance.


mpl.rc("font", size=18)

pgm = daft.PGM([13.6, 2.2], origin=[1.15, 1.0], node_ec="none")
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("parameter", r"parameter", 2.0, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("observations", r"observations", 2.0, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta", r"$\theta$", 5.5, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_0", r"$y_0$", 4, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_1", r"$y_1$", 5, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("dots", r"$\cdots$", 6, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_k", r"$y_k$", 7, 2))
pgm.add_edge("theta", "y_0")
pgm.add_edge("theta", "y_1")
pgm.add_edge("theta", "y_k")
pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

When we analyze data unpooled, we imply that they are sampled independently from separate models. At the opposite extreme from the pooled case, this approach claims that differences between sampling units are too large to combine them:


mpl.rc("font", size=18)

pgm = daft.PGM([13.6, 2.2], origin=[1.15, 1.0], node_ec="none")
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("parameter", r"parameter", 2.0, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("observations", r"observations", 2.0, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta_0", r"$\theta_0$", 4, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta_1", r"$\theta_1$", 5, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta_dots", r"$\cdots$", 6, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta_k", r"$\theta_k$", 7, 3))

pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_0", r"$y_0$", 4, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_1", r"$y_1$", 5, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_dots", r"$\cdots$", 6, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_k", r"$y_k$", 7, 2))
pgm.add_edge("theta_0", "y_0")
pgm.add_edge("theta_1", "y_1")
pgm.add_edge("theta_k", "y_k")
pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

In a hierarchical model, parameters are viewed as a sample from a population distribution of parameters. Thus, we view them as being neither entirely different or exactly the same. This is known as partial pooling.


mpl.rc("font", size=18)

pgm = daft.PGM([13.6, 3.4], origin=[1.15, 1.0], node_ec="none")
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("model", r"model", 2.0, 4))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("parameter", r"parameter", 2.0, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("observations", r"observations", 2.0, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("mu_sigma", r"$\mu,\sigma^2$", 5.5, 4))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta_0", r"$\theta_0$", 4, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta_1", r"$\theta_1$", 5, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta_dots", r"$\cdots$", 6, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("theta_k", r"$\theta_k$", 7, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_0", r"$y_0$", 4, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_1", r"$y_1$", 5, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_dots", r"$\cdots$", 6, 2))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("y_k", r"$y_k$", 7, 2))
pgm.add_edge("mu_sigma", "theta_0")
pgm.add_edge("mu_sigma", "theta_1")
pgm.add_edge("mu_sigma", "theta_k")
pgm.add_edge("theta_0", "y_0")
pgm.add_edge("theta_1", "y_1")
pgm.add_edge("theta_k", "y_k")
pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

5.1 Partial Pooling

The simplest partial pooling model for the household radon dataset is one which simply estimates radon levels, without any predictors at either the group or individual level. An example of a individual-level predictor is whether the data point is from the basement or the first floor. A group-level predictor can be the county-wide mean uranium levels.

A partial pooling model represents a compromise between the pooled and unpooled extremes, approximately a weighted average (based on sample size) of the unpooled county estimates and the pooled estimates.

Let $\hat{\alpha}_j$ be the estimated log-radon level in county $j$. It's just an intercept; we ignore slopes for now. $n_j$ is the number of observations from county $j$. $\sigma_{\alpha}$ and $\sigma_y$ are the variance within the parameter and the sampling variance respectively. Then a partial pooling model could posit:

$$\hat{\alpha}_j \approx \frac{(n_j/\sigma_y^2)\bar{y}_j + (1/\sigma_{\alpha}^2)\bar{y} }{(n_j/\sigma_y^2) + (1/\sigma_{\alpha}^2)}$$

We expect the following when using partial pooling:

  • Estimates for counties with smaller sample sizes will shrink towards the state-wide average.
  • Estimates for counties with larger sample sizes will be closer to the unpooled county estimates.

mpl.rc("font", size=12)
pgm = daft.PGM([7, 4.5], node_unit=1.2)
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "mu_a_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        1,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_a_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        3,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        4,
        3,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("mu_a", r"$\mu_a$", 1, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_a", r"$\sigma_a$", 3, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("a", r"$a \sim \mathcal{N}$", 2, 2, scale=1.25))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_y", r"$\sigma_y$", 4, 2))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "y_i", r"$y_i \sim \mathcal{N}$", 3.25, 1, scale=1.25, observed=True))
pgm.add_edge("mu_a_prior", "mu_a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a_prior", "sigma_a")
pgm.add_edge("mu_a", "a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a", "a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_prior", "sigma_y")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_y", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("a", "y_i")
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([1.4, 1.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:85$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([2.65, 0.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))

pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

def partial_pooling_model(county):
  """Creates a joint distribution for the partial pooling model."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),    # mu_a
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_a
      lambda sigma_a, mu_a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # a
          loc=mu_a[..., tf.newaxis] * tf.ones([num_counties])[tf.newaxis, ...],
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_a),
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_y
      lambda sigma_y, a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # y
          loc=tf.gather(a, county, axis=-1),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_y)
  ])


@tf.function
def partial_pooling_log_prob(mu_a, sigma_a, a, sigma_y):
  """Computes joint log prob pinned at `log_radon`."""
  return partial_pooling_model(county).log_prob(
      [mu_a, sigma_a, a, sigma_y, log_radon])
@tf.function
def sample_partial_pooling(num_chains, num_results, num_burnin_steps):
  """Samples from the partial pooling model."""
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=partial_pooling_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=10,
      step_size=0.01)

  initial_state = [
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_mu_a'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='init_a'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_y')
  ]
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Identity(),  # mu_a
      tfb.Exp(),       # sigma_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # a
      tfb.Exp()        # sigma_y
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)
  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
PartialPoolingModel = collections.namedtuple(
    'PartialPoolingModel', ['mu_a', 'sigma_a', 'a', 'sigma_y'])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_partial_pooling(
    num_chains=4, num_results=1000, num_burnin_steps=1000)

print('Acceptance Probabilities: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
partial_pooling_samples = PartialPoolingModel._make(samples)

Acceptance Probabilities:  [0.981 0.989 0.981 0.993]

for var in ['mu_a', 'sigma_a', 'sigma_y']:
  print(
      'R-hat for ', var, '\t:',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(getattr(partial_pooling_samples,
                                                 var)).numpy())
R-hat for  mu_a     : 1.0246037
R-hat for  sigma_a  : 1.0960767
R-hat for  sigma_y  : 1.0048983

partial_pooling_intercepts = reduce_samples(
    partial_pooling_samples.a.numpy(), np.mean)
partial_pooling_intercepts_se = reduce_samples(
    partial_pooling_samples.a.numpy(), np.std)

def plot_unpooled_vs_partial_pooling_estimates():
  fig, axes = plt.subplots(1, 2, figsize=(14, 6), sharex=True, sharey=True)

  # Order counties by number of observations (and add some jitter).
  num_obs_per_county = (
      radon.groupby('county')['idnum'].count().values.astype(np.float32))
  num_obs_per_county += np.random.normal(scale=0.5, size=num_counties)
  
  intercepts_list = [unpooled_intercepts, partial_pooling_intercepts]
  intercepts_se_list = [unpooled_intercepts_se, partial_pooling_intercepts_se]

  for ax, means, std_errors in zip(axes, intercepts_list, intercepts_se_list):
    ax.plot(num_obs_per_county, means, 'C0.')
    for n, m, se in zip(num_obs_per_county, means, std_errors):
      ax.plot([n, n], [m - se, m + se], 'C1-', alpha=.5)

  for ax in axes:
    ax.set_xscale('log')
    ax.set_xlabel('No. of Observations Per County')
    ax.set_xlim(1, 100)
    ax.set_ylabel('Log Radon Estimate (with Standard Error)')
    ax.set_ylim(0, 3)
    ax.hlines(partial_pooling_intercepts.mean(), .9, 125, 'k', '--', alpha=.5)
  axes[0].set_title('Unpooled Estimates')
  axes[1].set_title('Partially Pooled Estimates')

plot_unpooled_vs_partial_pooling_estimates()

png

Notice the difference between the unpooled and partially-pooled estimates, particularly at smaller sample sizes. The former are both more extreme and more imprecise.

5.2 Varying Intercepts

We now a consider a more complex model that allows intercepts to vary across county, according to a random effect.

$$y_i = \alpha_{j[i]} + \beta x_{i} + \epsilon_i$$

where

$$\epsilon_i \sim N(0, \sigma_y^2)$$

and the intercept random effect:

$$\alpha_{j[i]} \sim N(\mu_{\alpha}, \sigma_{\alpha}^2)$$

The slope $\beta$, which lets the observation vary according to the location of measurement (basement or first floor), is still a fixed effect shared between different counties.

As with the the unpooling model, we set a separate intercept for each county, but rather than fitting separate least squares regression models for each county, multilevel modeling shares strength among counties, allowing for more reasonable inference in counties with little data.


mpl.rc("font", size=12)
pgm = daft.PGM([7, 4.5], node_unit=1.2)
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "mu_a_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        1,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_a_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        3,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "b_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        4,
        3.5,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("b", r"$b$", 4, 2.5))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        6,
        3.5,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("mu_a", r"$\mu_a$", 1, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_a", r"$\sigma_a$", 3, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("a", r"$a \sim \mathcal{N}$", 2, 2, scale=1.25))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_y", r"$\sigma_y$", 6, 2.5))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "y_i", r"$y_i \sim \mathcal{N}$", 4, 1, scale=1.25, observed=True))
pgm.add_edge("mu_a_prior", "mu_a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a_prior", "sigma_a")
pgm.add_edge("mu_a", "a")
pgm.add_edge("b_prior", "b")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a", "a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_prior", "sigma_y")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_y", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("a", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("b", "y_i")
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([1.4, 1.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:85$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([3.4, 0.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))

pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

def varying_intercept_model(floor, county):
  """Creates a joint distribution for the varying intercept model."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),    # mu_a
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_a
      lambda sigma_a, mu_a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # a
          loc=affine(tf.ones([num_counties]), mu_a[..., tf.newaxis]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_a),
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),    # b
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_y
      lambda sigma_y, b, a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # y
          loc=affine(floor, b[..., tf.newaxis], tf.gather(a, county, axis=-1)),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_y)
  ])


def varying_intercept_log_prob(mu_a, sigma_a, a, b, sigma_y):
  """Computes joint log prob pinned at `log_radon`."""
  return varying_intercept_model(floor, county).log_prob(
      [mu_a, sigma_a, a, b, sigma_y, log_radon])
@tf.function
def sample_varying_intercepts(num_chains, num_results, num_burnin_steps):
  """Samples from the varying intercepts model."""
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=varying_intercept_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=10,
      step_size=0.01)

  initial_state = [
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_mu_a'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='init_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_b'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_y')
  ]
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Identity(),  # mu_a
      tfb.Exp(),       # sigma_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # a
      tfb.Identity(),  # b
      tfb.Exp()        # sigma_y
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)
  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
VaryingInterceptsModel = collections.namedtuple(
    'VaryingInterceptsModel', ['mu_a', 'sigma_a', 'a', 'b', 'sigma_y'])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_varying_intercepts(
    num_chains=4, num_results=1000, num_burnin_steps=1000)

print('Acceptance Probabilities: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
varying_intercepts_samples = VaryingInterceptsModel._make(samples)
Acceptance Probabilities:  [0.983 0.979 0.977 0.975]

for var in ['mu_a', 'sigma_a', 'b', 'sigma_y']:
  print(
      'R-hat for ', var, ': ',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(
          getattr(varying_intercepts_samples, var)).numpy())
R-hat for  mu_a :  1.0232929
R-hat for  sigma_a :  1.0050445
R-hat for  b :  1.0202405
R-hat for  sigma_y :  1.0012697

varying_intercepts_estimates = LinearEstimates(
    sample_mean(varying_intercepts_samples.a),
    sample_mean(varying_intercepts_samples.b))
sample_counties = ('LAC QUI PARLE', 'AITKIN', 'KOOCHICHING', 'DOUGLAS', 'CLAY',
                   'STEARNS', 'RAMSEY', 'ST LOUIS')
plot_estimates(
    linear_estimates=[
        unpooled_estimates, pooled_estimate, varying_intercepts_estimates
    ],
    labels=['Unpooled', 'Pooled', 'Varying Intercepts'],
    sample_counties=sample_counties)

png

def plot_posterior(var_name, var_samples):
  if isinstance(var_samples, tf.Tensor):
    var_samples = var_samples.numpy() # convert to numpy array

  fig = plt.figure(figsize=(10, 3))
  ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
  ax.hist(var_samples.flatten(), bins=40, edgecolor='white')
  sample_mean = var_samples.mean()
  ax.text(
      sample_mean,
      100,
      'mean={:.3f}'.format(sample_mean),
      color='white',
      fontsize=12)
  ax.set_xlabel('posterior of ' + var_name)
  plt.show()


plot_posterior('b', varying_intercepts_samples.b)
plot_posterior('sigma_a', varying_intercepts_samples.sigma_a)

png

png

The estimate for the floor coefficient is approximately -0.69, which can be interpreted as houses without basements having about half ($\exp(-0.69) = 0.50$) the radon levels of those with basements, after accounting for county.

for var in ['b']:
  var_samples = getattr(varying_intercepts_samples, var)
  mean = var_samples.numpy().mean()
  std = var_samples.numpy().std()
  r_hat = tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(var_samples).numpy()
  n_eff = tfp.mcmc.effective_sample_size(var_samples).numpy().sum()

  print('var: ', var, ' mean: ', mean, ' std: ', std, ' n_eff: ', n_eff,
        ' r_hat: ', r_hat)
var:  b  mean:  -0.6964408  std:  0.07252218  n_eff:  462.5786  r_hat:  1.0202405

def plot_intercepts_and_slopes(linear_estimates, title):
  xvals = np.arange(2)
  intercepts = np.ones([num_counties]) * linear_estimates.intercept
  slopes = np.ones([num_counties]) * linear_estimates.slope
  fig, ax = plt.subplots()
  for c in range(num_counties):
    ax.plot(xvals, intercepts[c] + slopes[c] * xvals, 'bo-', alpha=0.4)
  plt.xlim(-0.2, 1.2)
  ax.set_xticks([0, 1])
  ax.set_xticklabels(['Basement', 'First Floor'])
  ax.set_ylabel('Log Radon level')
  plt.title(title)
  plt.show()
plot_intercepts_and_slopes(varying_intercepts_estimates,
                           'Log Radon Estimates (Varying Intercepts)')

png

5.3 Varying Slopes

Alternatively, we can posit a model that allows the counties to vary according to how the location of measurement (basement or first floor) influences the radon reading. In this case the intercept $\alpha$ is shared between counties.

$$y_i = \alpha + \beta_{j[i]} x_{i} + \epsilon_i$$

mpl.rc("font", size=12)
pgm = daft.PGM([10, 4.5], node_unit=1.2)
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "mu_b_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        3.2,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "a_prior", r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$", 2, 3, fixed=True, offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("a", r"$a$", 2, 2))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        4,
        3.5,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_y", r"$\sigma_y$", 4, 2.5))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "mu_b_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        5,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_b_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        7,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("mu_b", r"$\mu_b$", 5, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_b", r"$\sigma_b$", 7, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("b", r"$b \sim \mathcal{N}$", 6, 2, scale=1.25))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "y_i", r"$y_i \sim \mathcal{N}$", 4, 1, scale=1.25, observed=True))
pgm.add_edge("a_prior", "a")

pgm.add_edge("mu_b_prior", "mu_b")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_b_prior", "sigma_b")
pgm.add_edge("mu_b", "b")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_b", "b")

pgm.add_edge("sigma_prior", "sigma_y")

pgm.add_edge("sigma_y", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("a", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("b", "y_i")
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([5.4, 1.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:85$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([3.4, 0.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))

pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

def varying_slopes_model(floor, county):
  """Creates a joint distribution for the varying slopes model."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # mu_b
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_b
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # a
      lambda _, sigma_b, mu_b: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # b
          loc=affine(tf.ones([num_counties]), mu_b[..., tf.newaxis]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_b),
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_y
      lambda sigma_y, b, a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # y
          loc=affine(floor, tf.gather(b, county, axis=-1), a[..., tf.newaxis]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_y)
  ])


def varying_slopes_log_prob(mu_b, sigma_b, a, b, sigma_y):
  return varying_slopes_model(floor, county).log_prob(
      [mu_b, sigma_b, a, b, sigma_y, log_radon])
@tf.function
def sample_varying_slopes(num_chains, num_results, num_burnin_steps):
  """Samples from the varying slopes model."""
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=varying_slopes_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=25,
      step_size=0.01)

  initial_state = [
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_mu_b'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_b'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='init_b'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_y')
  ]
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Identity(),  # mu_b
      tfb.Exp(),       # sigma_b
      tfb.Identity(),  # a
      tfb.Identity(),  # b
      tfb.Exp()        # sigma_y
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)
  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
VaryingSlopesModel = collections.namedtuple(
    'VaryingSlopesModel', ['mu_b', 'sigma_b', 'a', 'b', 'sigma_y'])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_varying_slopes(
    num_chains=4, num_results=1000, num_burnin_steps=1000)

print('Acceptance Probabilities: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
varying_slopes_samples = VaryingSlopesModel._make(samples)
Acceptance Probabilities:  [0.982 0.975 0.906 0.985]

for var in ['mu_b', 'sigma_b', 'a', 'sigma_y']:
  print(
      'R-hat for ', var, '\t: ',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(getattr(varying_slopes_samples,
                                                 var)).numpy())
R-hat for  mu_b :  1.008923
R-hat for  sigma_b :  1.062923
R-hat for  a :  1.0018876
R-hat for  sigma_y :  1.0047431

varying_slopes_estimates = LinearEstimates(
    sample_mean(varying_slopes_samples.a),
    sample_mean(varying_slopes_samples.b))

plot_intercepts_and_slopes(varying_slopes_estimates,
                           'Log Radon Estimates (Varying Slopes)')

png

5.4 Varying Intercepts and Slopes

The most general model allows both the intercept and slope to vary by county:

$$y_i = \alpha_{j[i]} + \beta_{j[i]} x_{i} + \epsilon_i$$

mpl.rc("font", size=12)
pgm = daft.PGM([10, 4.5], node_unit=1.2)
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "mu_a_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        1,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_a_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        3,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("mu_a", r"$\mu_a$", 1, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_a", r"$\sigma_a$", 3, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("a", r"$a \sim \mathcal{N}$", 2, 2, scale=1.25))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        4,
        3.5,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_y", r"$\sigma_y$", 4, 2.5))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "mu_b_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        5,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_b_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        7,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("mu_b", r"$\mu_b$", 5, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_b", r"$\sigma_b$", 7, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("b", r"$b \sim \mathcal{N}$", 6, 2, scale=1.25))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "y_i", r"$y_i \sim \mathcal{N}$", 4, 1, scale=1.25, observed=True))
pgm.add_edge("mu_a_prior", "mu_a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a_prior", "sigma_a")
pgm.add_edge("mu_a", "a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a", "a")

pgm.add_edge("mu_b_prior", "mu_b")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_b_prior", "sigma_b")
pgm.add_edge("mu_b", "b")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_b", "b")

pgm.add_edge("sigma_prior", "sigma_y")

pgm.add_edge("sigma_y", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("a", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("b", "y_i")
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([1.4, 1.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:85$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([5.4, 1.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:85$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([3.4, 0.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))

pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

def varying_intercepts_and_slopes_model(floor, county):
  """Creates a joint distribution for the varying slope model."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),    # mu_a
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_a
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),    # mu_b
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_b
      lambda _, __, sigma_a, mu_a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # a
          loc=affine(tf.ones([num_counties]), mu_a[..., tf.newaxis]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_a),
      lambda _, sigma_b, mu_b: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # b
          loc=affine(tf.ones([num_counties]), mu_b[..., tf.newaxis]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_b),
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_y
      lambda sigma_y, b, a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # y
          loc=affine(floor, tf.gather(b, county, axis=-1),
                     tf.gather(a, county, axis=-1)),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_y)
  ])


@tf.function
def varying_intercepts_and_slopes_log_prob(mu_a, sigma_a, mu_b, sigma_b, a, b,
                                           sigma_y):
  """Computes joint log prob pinned at `log_radon`."""
  return varying_intercepts_and_slopes_model(floor, county).log_prob(
      [mu_a, sigma_a, mu_b, sigma_b, a, b, sigma_y, log_radon])
@tf.function
def sample_varying_intercepts_and_slopes(num_chains, num_results,
                                         num_burnin_steps):
  """Samples from the varying intercepts and slopes model."""
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=varying_intercepts_and_slopes_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=50,
      step_size=0.01)

  initial_state = [
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_mu_a'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_mu_b'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_b'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='init_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='init_b'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_y')
  ]
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Identity(),  # mu_a
      tfb.Exp(),       # sigma_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # mu_b
      tfb.Exp(),       # sigma_b
      tfb.Identity(),  # a
      tfb.Identity(),  # b
      tfb.Exp()        # sigma_y
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)
  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
VaryingInterceptsAndSlopesModel = collections.namedtuple(
    'VaryingInterceptsAndSlopesModel',
    ['mu_a', 'sigma_a', 'mu_b', 'sigma_b', 'a', 'b', 'sigma_y'])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_varying_intercepts_and_slopes(
    num_chains=4, num_results=1000, num_burnin_steps=500)

print('Acceptance Probabilities: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
varying_intercepts_and_slopes_samples = VaryingInterceptsAndSlopesModel._make(
    samples)
Acceptance Probabilities:  [0.986 0.956 0.987 0.989]

for var in ['mu_a', 'sigma_a', 'mu_b', 'sigma_b']:
  print(
      'R-hat for ', var, '\t: ',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(
          getattr(varying_intercepts_and_slopes_samples, var)).numpy())
R-hat for  mu_a     :  1.0017208
R-hat for  sigma_a  :  1.006978
R-hat for  mu_b     :  1.0078236
R-hat for  sigma_b  :  1.0340817

varying_intercepts_and_slopes_estimates = LinearEstimates(
    sample_mean(varying_intercepts_and_slopes_samples.a),
    sample_mean(varying_intercepts_and_slopes_samples.b))

plot_intercepts_and_slopes(
    varying_intercepts_and_slopes_estimates,
    'Log Radon Estimates (Varying Intercepts and Slopes)')

png

forest_plot(
    num_chains=4,
    num_vars=num_counties,
    var_name='a',
    var_labels=county_name,
    samples=varying_intercepts_and_slopes_samples.a.numpy())
forest_plot(
    num_chains=4,
    num_vars=num_counties,
    var_name='b',
    var_labels=county_name,
    samples=varying_intercepts_and_slopes_samples.b.numpy())

png

png

6 Adding Group-level Predictors

A primary strength of multilevel models is the ability to handle predictors on multiple levels simultaneously. If we consider the varying-intercepts model above:

$$y_i = \alpha_{j[i]} + \beta x_{i} + \epsilon_i$$

we may, instead of a simple random effect to describe variation in the expected radon value, specify another regression model with a county-level covariate. Here, we use the county uranium reading $u_j$, which is thought to be related to radon levels:

$$\alpha_j = \gamma_0 + \gamma_1 u_j + \zeta_j$$
$$\zeta_j \sim N(0, \sigma_{\alpha}^2)$$

Thus, we are now incorporating a house-level predictor (floor or basement) as well as a county-level predictor (uranium).

Note that the model has both indicator variables for each county, plus a county-level covariate. In classical regression, this would result in collinearity. In a multilevel model, the partial pooling of the intercepts towards the expected value of the group-level linear model avoids this.

Group-level predictors also serve to reduce group-level variation $\sigma_{\alpha}$. An important implication of this is that the group-level estimate induces stronger pooling.


mpl.rc("font", size=12)
pgm = daft.PGM([10, 4.5], node_unit=1.2)
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "gamma_0_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        0.5,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "gamma_1_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        1.5,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("gamma_0", r"$\gamma_0$", 0.5, 3))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("gamma_1", r"$\gamma_1$", 1.5, 3))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_a_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        3,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_a", r"$\sigma_a$", 3, 3.5))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("eps_a", r"$eps_a$", 3, 2.5, scale=1.25))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("a", r"$a \sim \mathcal{Det}$", 1.5, 1.2, scale=1.5))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{U}(0, 100)$",
        4,
        3.5,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_y", r"$\sigma_y$", 4, 2.5))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("b_prior", r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$", 5, 3, fixed=True))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("b", r"$b$", 5, 2))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "y_i", r"$y_i \sim \mathcal{N}$", 4, 1, scale=1.25, observed=True))

pgm.add_edge("gamma_0_prior", "gamma_0")
pgm.add_edge("gamma_1_prior", "gamma_1")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a_prior", "sigma_a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a", "eps_a")
pgm.add_edge("gamma_0", "a")
pgm.add_edge("gamma_1", "a")
pgm.add_edge("eps_a", "a")

pgm.add_edge("b_prior", "b")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_prior", "sigma_y")

pgm.add_edge("sigma_y", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("a", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("b", "y_i")
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([2.4, 1.7, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:85$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([0.9, 0.4, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([3.4, 0.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))

pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

def hierarchical_intercepts_model(floor, county, log_uranium):
  """Creates a joint distribution for the varying slope model."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_a
      lambda sigma_a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # eps_a
          loc=tf.zeros([num_counties]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_a),
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # gamma_0
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # gamma_1
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # b
      tfd.Uniform(low=0., high=100),  # sigma_y
      lambda sigma_y, b, gamma_1, gamma_0, eps_a: tfd.
      MultivariateNormalDiag(  # y
          loc=affine(
              floor, b[..., tf.newaxis],
              affine(log_uranium, gamma_1[..., tf.newaxis], 
                     gamma_0[..., tf.newaxis]) + tf.gather(eps_a, county, axis=-1)),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_y)
  ])


def hierarchical_intercepts_log_prob(sigma_a, eps_a, gamma_0, gamma_1, b,
                                     sigma_y):
  """Computes joint log prob pinned at `log_radon`."""
  return hierarchical_intercepts_model(floor, county, log_uranium).log_prob(
      [sigma_a, eps_a, gamma_0, gamma_1, b, sigma_y, log_radon])
@tf.function
def sample_hierarchical_intercepts(num_chains, num_results, num_burnin_steps):
  """Samples from the hierarchical intercepts model."""
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=hierarchical_intercepts_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=10,
      step_size=0.01)

  initial_state = [
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='eps_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_gamma_0'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_gamma_1'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_b'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_y')
  ]
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Exp(),       # sigma_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # eps_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # gamma_0
      tfb.Identity(),  # gamma_0
      tfb.Identity(),  # b
      # Maps reals to [0, 100].
      tfb.Chain([tfb.AffineScalar(shift=50., scale=50.),
                 tfb.Tanh()])  # sigma_y
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)
  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
HierarchicalInterceptsModel = collections.namedtuple(
    'HierarchicalInterceptsModel',
    ['sigma_a', 'eps_a', 'gamma_0', 'gamma_1', 'b', 'sigma_y'])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_hierarchical_intercepts(
    num_chains=4, num_results=2000, num_burnin_steps=500)
print('Acceptance Probabilities: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
hierarchical_intercepts_samples = HierarchicalInterceptsModel._make(samples)
Acceptance Probabilities:  [0.9565 0.955  0.9605 0.95  ]

for var in ['sigma_a', 'gamma_0', 'gamma_1', 'b', 'sigma_y']:
  print(
      'R-hat for', var, ':',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(
          getattr(hierarchical_intercepts_samples, var)).numpy())
R-hat for sigma_a : 1.1946524
R-hat for gamma_0 : 1.0090296
R-hat for gamma_1 : 1.0035881
R-hat for b : 1.0004182
R-hat for sigma_y : 1.0084951

def plot_hierarchical_intercepts():
  mean_and_var = lambda x : [reduce_samples(x, fn) for fn in [np.mean, np.var]]
  gamma_0_mean, gamma_0_var = mean_and_var(
    hierarchical_intercepts_samples.gamma_0)
  gamma_1_mean, gamma_1_var = mean_and_var(
    hierarchical_intercepts_samples.gamma_1)
  eps_a_means, eps_a_vars  = mean_and_var(hierarchical_intercepts_samples.eps_a)

  mu_a_means = gamma_0_mean + gamma_1_mean * log_uranium
  mu_a_vars = gamma_0_var + np.square(log_uranium) * gamma_1_var
  a_means = mu_a_means + eps_a_means[county]
  a_stds = np.sqrt(mu_a_vars + eps_a_vars[county])

  plt.figure()
  plt.scatter(log_uranium, a_means, marker='.', c='C0')
  xvals = np.linspace(-1, 0.8)
  plt.plot(xvals,gamma_0_mean + gamma_1_mean * xvals, 'k--')
  plt.xlim(-1, 0.8)

  for ui, m, se in zip(log_uranium, a_means, a_stds):
    plt.plot([ui, ui], [m - se, m + se], 'C1-', alpha=0.1)
  plt.xlabel('County-level uranium')
  plt.ylabel('Intercept estimate')


plot_hierarchical_intercepts()

png

The standard errors on the intercepts are narrower than for the partial-pooling model without a county-level covariate.

6.2 Correlations Among Levels

In some instances, having predictors at multiple levels can reveal correlation between individual-level variables and group residuals. We can account for this by including the average of the individual predictors as a covariate in the model for the group intercept.

$$\alpha_j = \gamma_0 + \gamma_1 u_j + \gamma_2 \bar{x} + \zeta_j$$

These are broadly referred to as contextual effects.


mpl.rc("font", size=12)
pgm = daft.PGM([10, 4.5], node_unit=1.2)
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "gamma_prior",
        r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$",
        1.5,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(10, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("gamma", r"$\gamma$", 1.5, 3.5))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("mu_a", r"$\mu_a$", 1.5, 2.2))
pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_a_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{HalfCauchy}(0, 5)$",
        3,
        4,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(0, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_a", r"$\sigma_a$", 3, 3.5))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("eps_a", r"$eps_a$", 3, 2.5, scale=1.25))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("a", r"$a \sim \mathcal{Det}$", 1.5, 1.2, scale=1.5))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "sigma_prior",
        r"$\mathrm{U}(0, 100)$",
        4,
        3.5,
        fixed=True,
        offset=(20, 5)))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("sigma_y", r"$\sigma_y$", 4, 2.5))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("b_prior", r"$\mathcal{N}(0, 10^5)$", 5, 3, fixed=True))
pgm.add_node(daft.Node("b", r"$b$", 5, 2))

pgm.add_node(
    daft.Node(
        "y_i", r"$y_i \sim \mathcal{N}$", 4, 1, scale=1.25, observed=True))

pgm.add_edge("gamma_prior", "gamma")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a_prior", "sigma_a")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_a", "eps_a")
pgm.add_edge("gamma", "mu_a")
pgm.add_edge("mu_a", "a")
pgm.add_edge("eps_a", "a")

pgm.add_edge("b_prior", "b")
pgm.add_edge("sigma_prior", "sigma_y")

pgm.add_edge("sigma_y", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("a", "y_i")
pgm.add_edge("b", "y_i")
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([0.9, 2.9, 1.2, 1.0], "$i = 1:3$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([2.4, 1.7, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:85$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([0.9, 0.4, 1.2, 2.2], "$i = 1:919$"))
pgm.add_plate(daft.Plate([3.4, 0.2, 1.2, 1.4], "$i = 1:919$"))

pgm.render()
plt.show()

png

# Create a new variable for mean of floor across counties
xbar = tf.convert_to_tensor(radon.groupby('county')['floor'].mean(), tf.float32)
xbar = tf.gather(xbar, county, axis=-1)
def contextual_effects_model(floor, county, log_uranium, xbar):
  """Creates a joint distribution for the varying slope model."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_a
      lambda sigma_a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # eps_a
          loc=tf.zeros([num_counties]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_a),
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # gamma_0
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # gamma_1
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # gamma_2
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # b
      tfd.Uniform(low=0., high=100),  # sigma_y
      lambda sigma_y, b, gamma_2, gamma_1, gamma_0, eps_a: tfd.
      MultivariateNormalDiag(  # y
          loc=affine(
              floor, b[..., tf.newaxis],
              affine(log_uranium, gamma_1[..., tf.newaxis], gamma_0[
                  ..., tf.newaxis]) + affine(xbar, gamma_2[..., tf.newaxis]) +
              tf.gather(eps_a, county, axis=-1)),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_y)
  ])


def contextual_effects_log_prob(sigma_a, eps_a, gamma_0, gamma_1, gamma_2, b,
                                sigma_y):
  """Computes joint log prob pinned at `log_radon`."""
  return contextual_effects_model(floor, county, log_uranium, xbar).log_prob(
      [sigma_a, eps_a, gamma_0, gamma_1, gamma_2, b, sigma_y, log_radon])
@tf.function
def sample_contextual_effects(num_chains, num_results, num_burnin_steps):
  """Samples from the hierarchical intercepts model."""
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=contextual_effects_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=10,
      step_size=0.01)

  initial_state = [
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='eps_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_gamma_0'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_gamma_1'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_gamma_2'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_b'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_y')
  ]
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Exp(),       # sigma_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # eps_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # gamma_0
      tfb.Identity(),  # gamma_1
      tfb.Identity(),  # gamma_2
      tfb.Identity(),  # b
      tfb.Chain([tfb.AffineScalar(shift=50., scale=50.),
                 tfb.Tanh()])  # sigma_y
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)
  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
ContextualEffectsModel = collections.namedtuple(
    'ContextualEffectsModel',
    ['sigma_a', 'eps_a', 'gamma_0', 'gamma_1', 'gamma_2', 'b', 'sigma_y'])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_contextual_effects(
    num_chains=4, num_results=2000, num_burnin_steps=500)
print('Acceptance Probabilities: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
contextual_effects_samples = ContextualEffectsModel._make(samples)
Acceptance Probabilities:  [0.96  0.96  0.954 0.953]

for var in ['sigma_a', 'gamma_0', 'gamma_1', 'gamma_2', 'b', 'sigma_y']:
  print(
      'R-hat for ', var, ': ',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(
          getattr(contextual_effects_samples, var)).numpy())
R-hat for  sigma_a :  1.0712963
R-hat for  gamma_0 :  1.0030953
R-hat for  gamma_1 :  1.0050908
R-hat for  gamma_2 :  1.0047765
R-hat for  b :  1.0053986
R-hat for  sigma_y :  1.0042549

for var in ['gamma_0', 'gamma_1', 'gamma_2']:
  var_samples = getattr(contextual_effects_samples, var)
  mean = var_samples.numpy().mean()
  std = var_samples.numpy().std()
  r_hat = tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(var_samples).numpy()
  n_eff = tfp.mcmc.effective_sample_size(var_samples).numpy().sum()

  print(var, ' mean: ', mean, ' std: ', std, ' n_eff: ', n_eff, ' r_hat: ',
        r_hat)
gamma_0  mean:  1.3952312  std:  0.051441457  n_eff:  606.4284  r_hat:  1.0030953
gamma_1  mean:  0.7191555  std:  0.092832364  n_eff:  1171.0574  r_hat:  1.0050908
gamma_2  mean:  0.39767176  std:  0.2065602  n_eff:  413.6861  r_hat:  1.0047765

So, we might infer from this that counties with higher proportions of houses without basements tend to have higher baseline levels of radon. Perhaps this is related to the soil type, which in turn might influence what type of structures are built.

6.3 Prediction

Gelman (2006) used cross-validation tests to check the prediction error of the unpooled, pooled, and partially-pooled models.

Root mean squared cross-validation prediction errors:

  • unpooled = 0.86
  • pooled = 0.84
  • multilevel = 0.79

There are two types of prediction that can be made in a multilevel model:

  1. A new individual within an existing group
  2. A new individual within a new group

For example, if we wanted to make a prediction for a new house with no basement in St. Louis county, we just need to sample from the radon model with the appropriate intercept.

county_name.index('ST LOUIS')
69

That is,

$$\tilde{y}_i \sim N(\alpha_{69} + \beta (x_i=1), \sigma_y^2)$$
st_louis_log_uranium = tf.convert_to_tensor(
    radon.where(radon['county'] == 69)['log_uranium_ppm'].mean(), tf.float32)
st_louis_xbar = tf.convert_to_tensor(
    radon.where(radon['county'] == 69)['floor'].mean(), tf.float32)
@tf.function
def intercept_a(gamma_0, gamma_1, gamma_2, eps_a, log_uranium, xbar, county):
  return (affine(log_uranium, gamma_1, gamma_0) + affine(xbar, gamma_2) +
          tf.gather(eps_a, county, axis=-1))


def contextual_effects_predictive_model(floor, county, log_uranium, xbar,
                                        st_louis_log_uranium, st_louis_xbar):
  """Creates a joint distribution for the contextual effects model."""
  return tfd.JointDistributionSequential([
      tfd.HalfCauchy(loc=0., scale=5),  # sigma_a
      lambda sigma_a: tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(  # eps_a
          loc=tf.zeros([num_counties]),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_a),
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # gamma_0
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # gamma_1
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # gamma_2
      tfd.Normal(loc=0., scale=1e5),  # b
      tfd.Uniform(low=0., high=100),  # sigma_y
      # y
      lambda sigma_y, b, gamma_2, gamma_1, gamma_0, eps_a: (
        tfd.MultivariateNormalDiag(
          loc=affine(
              floor, b[..., tf.newaxis],
              intercept_a(gamma_0[..., tf.newaxis], 
                          gamma_1[..., tf.newaxis], gamma_2[..., tf.newaxis],
                          eps_a, log_uranium, xbar, county)),
          scale_identity_multiplier=sigma_y)),
      # stl_pred
      lambda _, sigma_y, b, gamma_2, gamma_1, gamma_0, eps_a: tfd.Normal(
          loc=intercept_a(gamma_0, gamma_1, gamma_2, eps_a,
                          st_louis_log_uranium, st_louis_xbar, 69) + b,
          scale=sigma_y)
  ])


@tf.function
def contextual_effects_predictive_log_prob(sigma_a, eps_a, gamma_0, gamma_1,
                                           gamma_2, b, sigma_y, stl_pred):
  """Computes joint log prob pinned at `log_radon`."""
  return contextual_effects_predictive_model(floor, county, log_uranium, xbar,
                                             st_louis_log_uranium,
                                             st_louis_xbar).log_prob([
                                                 sigma_a, eps_a, gamma_0,
                                                 gamma_1, gamma_2, b, sigma_y,
                                                 log_radon, stl_pred
                                             ])
@tf.function
def sample_contextual_effects_predictive(num_chains, num_results,
                                         num_burnin_steps):
  """Samples from the contextual effects predictive model."""
  hmc = tfp.mcmc.HamiltonianMonteCarlo(
      target_log_prob_fn=contextual_effects_predictive_log_prob,
      num_leapfrog_steps=50,
      step_size=0.01)

  initial_state = [
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains, num_counties], name='eps_a'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_gamma_0'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_gamma_1'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_gamma_2'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_b'),
      tf.ones([num_chains], name='init_sigma_y'),
      tf.zeros([num_chains], name='init_stl_pred')
  ]
  unconstraining_bijectors = [
      tfb.Exp(),       # sigma_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # eps_a
      tfb.Identity(),  # gamma_0
      tfb.Identity(),  # gamma_1
      tfb.Identity(),  # gamma_2
      tfb.Identity(),  # b
      tfb.Chain([tfb.AffineScalar(shift=50., scale=50.),
                 tfb.Tanh()]),  # sigma_y
      tfb.Identity(),  # stl_pred
  ]
  kernel = tfp.mcmc.TransformedTransitionKernel(
      inner_kernel=hmc, bijector=unconstraining_bijectors)
  samples, kernel_results = tfp.mcmc.sample_chain(
      num_results=num_results,
      num_burnin_steps=num_burnin_steps,
      current_state=initial_state,
      kernel=kernel)

  acceptance_probs = tf.reduce_mean(
      tf.cast(kernel_results.inner_results.is_accepted, tf.float32), axis=0)

  return samples, acceptance_probs
ContextualEffectsPredictiveModel = collections.namedtuple(
    'ContextualEffectsPredictiveModel', [
        'sigma_a', 'eps_a', 'gamma_0', 'gamma_1', 'gamma_2', 'b', 'sigma_y',
        'stl_pred'
    ])

samples, acceptance_probs = sample_contextual_effects_predictive(
    num_chains=4, num_results=2000, num_burnin_steps=500)
print('Acceptance Probabilities: ', acceptance_probs.numpy())
contextual_effects_pred_samples = ContextualEffectsPredictiveModel._make(
    samples)
Acceptance Probabilities:  [0.9805 0.9625 0.979  0.9785]

for var in [
    'sigma_a', 'gamma_0', 'gamma_1', 'gamma_2', 'b', 'sigma_y', 'stl_pred'
]:
  print(
      'R-hat for ', var, ': ',
      tfp.mcmc.potential_scale_reduction(
          getattr(contextual_effects_pred_samples, var)).numpy())
R-hat for  sigma_a :  1.0541265
R-hat for  gamma_0 :  1.0006033
R-hat for  gamma_1 :  1.0035511
R-hat for  gamma_2 :  1.0005729
R-hat for  b :  1.0017257
R-hat for  sigma_y :  1.0713499
R-hat for  stl_pred :  1.0025378

plot_traces('stl_pred', contextual_effects_pred_samples.stl_pred, num_chains=4)

png

plot_posterior('stl_pred', contextual_effects_pred_samples.stl_pred)

png

7 Conclusions

Benefits of Multilevel Models:

  • Accounting for natural hierarchical structure of observational data.
  • Estimation of coefficients for (under-represented) groups.
  • Incorporating individual- and group-level information when estimating group-level coefficients.
  • Allowing for variation among individual-level coefficients across groups.

References

Gelman, A., & Hill, J. (2006). Data Analysis Using Regression and Multilevel/Hierarchical Models (1st ed.). Cambridge University Press.

Gelman, A. (2006). Multilevel (Hierarchical) modeling: what it can and cannot do. Technometrics, 48(3), 432–435.