tfa.seq2seq.BahdanauAttention

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Implements Bahdanau-style (additive) attention.

This attention has two forms. The first is Bahdanau attention, as described in:

Dzmitry Bahdanau, Kyunghyun Cho, Yoshua Bengio. "Neural Machine Translation by Jointly Learning to Align and Translate." ICLR 2015. https://arxiv.org/abs/1409.0473

The second is the normalized form. This form is inspired by the weight normalization article:

Tim Salimans, Diederik P. Kingma. "Weight Normalization: A Simple Reparameterization to Accelerate Training of Deep Neural Networks." https://arxiv.org/abs/1602.07868

To enable the second form, construct the object with parameter normalize=True.

units The depth of the query mechanism.
memory The memory to query; usually the output of an RNN encoder. This tensor should be shaped [batch_size, max_time, ...].
memory_sequence_length (optional): Sequence lengths for the batch entries in memory. If provided, the memory tensor rows are masked with zeros for values past the respective sequence lengths.
normalize Python boolean. Whether to normalize the energy term.
probability_fn (optional) string, the name of function to convert the attention score to probabilities. The default is softmax which is tf.nn.softmax. Other options is hardmax, which is hardmax() within this module. Any other value will result into validation error. Default to use softmax.
kernel_initializer (optional), the name of the initializer for the attention kernel.
dtype The data type for the query and memory layers of the attention mechanism.
name Name to use when creating ops.
**kwargs Dictionary that contains other common arguments for layer creation.

activity_regularizer Optional regularizer function for the output of this layer.
alignments_size

dtype Dtype used by the weights of the layer, set in the constructor.
dynamic Whether the layer is dynamic (eager-only); set in the constructor.
input Retrieves the input tensor(s) of a layer.

Only applicable if the layer has exactly one input, i.e. if it is connected to one incoming layer.

input_spec InputSpec instance(s) describing the input format for this layer.

When you create a layer subclass, you can set self.input_spec to enable the layer to run input compatibility checks when it is called. Consider a Conv2D layer: it can only be called on a single input tensor of rank 4. As such, you can set, in __init__():

self.input_spec = tf.keras.layers.InputSpec(ndim=4)

Now, if you try to call the layer on an input that isn't rank 4 (for instance, an input of shape (2,), it will raise a nicely-formatted error:

ValueError: Input 0 of layer conv2d is incompatible with the layer:
expected ndim=4, found ndim=1. Full shape received: [2]

Input checks that can be specified via input_spec include:

  • Structure (e.g. a single input, a list of 2 inputs, etc)
  • Shape
  • Rank (ndim)
  • Dtype

For more information, see tf.keras.layers.InputSpec.

losses List of losses added using the add_loss() API.

Variable regularization tensors are created when this property is accessed, so it is eager safe: accessing losses under a tf.GradientTape will propagate gradients back to the corresponding variables.

class MyLayer(tf.keras.layers.Layer):
  def call(self, inputs):
    self.add_loss(tf.abs(tf.reduce_mean(inputs)))
    return inputs
l = MyLayer()
l(np.ones((10, 1)))
l.losses
[1.0]
inputs = tf.keras.Input(shape=(10,))
x = tf.keras.layers.Dense(10)(inputs)
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1)(x)
model = tf.keras.Model(inputs, outputs)
# Activity regularization.
model.add_loss(tf.abs(tf.reduce_mean(x)))
model.losses
[<tf.Tensor 'Abs:0' shape=() dtype=float32>]
inputs = tf.keras.Input(shape=(10,))
d = tf.keras.layers.Dense(10, kernel_initializer='ones')
x = d(inputs)
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1)(x)
model = tf.keras.Model(inputs, outputs)
# Weight regularization.
model.add_loss(lambda: tf.reduce_mean(d.kernel))
model.losses
[<tf.Tensor: shape=(), dtype=float32, numpy=1.0>]

memory_initialized Returns True if this attention mechanism has been initialized with a memory.
metrics List of metrics added using the add_metric() API.

input = tf.keras.layers.Input(shape=(3,))
d = tf.keras.layers.Dense(2)
output = d(input)
d.add_metric(tf.reduce_max(output), name='max')
d.add_metric(tf.reduce_min(output), name='min')
[m.name for m in d.metrics]
['max', 'min']

name Name of the layer (string), set in the constructor.
name_scope Returns a tf.name_scope instance for this class.
non_trainable_weights List of all non-trainable weights tracked by this layer.

Non-trainable weights are not updated during training. They are expected to be updated manually in call().

output Retrieves the output tensor(s) of a layer.

Only applicable if the layer has exactly one output, i.e. if it is connected to one incoming layer.

state_size

submodules Sequence of all sub-modules.

Submodules are modules which are properties of this module, or found as properties of modules which are properties of this module (and so on).

a = tf.Module()
b = tf.Module()
c = tf.Module()
a.b = b
b.c = c
list(a.submodules) == [b, c]
True
list(b.submodules) == [c]
True
list(c.submodules) == []
True

supports_masking Whether this layer supports computing a mask using compute_mask.
trainable

trainable_weights List of all trainable weights tracked by this layer.

Trainable weights are updated via gradient descent during training.

weights Returns the list of all layer variables/weights.

Methods

add_loss

Add loss tensor(s), potentially dependent on layer inputs.

Some losses (for instance, activity regularization losses) may be dependent on the inputs passed when calling a layer. Hence, when reusing the same layer on different inputs a and b, some entries in layer.losses may be dependent on a and some on b. This method automatically keeps track of dependencies.

This method can be used inside a subclassed layer or model's call function, in which case losses should be a Tensor or list of Tensors.

Example:

class MyLayer(tf.keras.layers.Layer):
  def call(self, inputs):
    self.add_loss(tf.abs(tf.reduce_mean(inputs)))
    return inputs

This method can also be called directly on a Functional Model during construction. In this case, any loss Tensors passed to this Model must be symbolic and be able to be traced back to the model's Inputs. These losses become part of the model's topology and are tracked in get_config.

Example:

inputs = tf.keras.Input(shape=(10,))
x = tf.keras.layers.Dense(10)(inputs)
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1)(x)
model = tf.keras.Model(inputs, outputs)
# Activity regularization.
model.add_loss(tf.abs(tf.reduce_mean(x)))

If this is not the case for your loss (if, for example, your loss references a Variable of one of the model's layers), you can wrap your loss in a zero-argument lambda. These losses are not tracked as part of the model's topology since they can't be serialized.

Example:

inputs = tf.keras.Input(shape=(10,))
d = tf.keras.layers.Dense(10)
x = d(inputs)
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1)(x)
model = tf.keras.Model(inputs, outputs)
# Weight regularization.
model.add_loss(lambda: tf.reduce_mean(d.kernel))

Arguments
losses Loss tensor, or list/tuple of tensors. Rather than tensors, losses may also be zero-argument callables which create a loss tensor.
**kwargs Additional keyword arguments for backward compatibility. Accepted values: inputs - Deprecated, will be automatically inferred.

add_metric

Adds metric tensor to the layer.

This method can be used inside the call() method of a subclassed layer or model.

class MyMetricLayer(tf.keras.layers.Layer):
  def __init__(self):
    super(MyMetricLayer, self).__init__(name='my_metric_layer')
    self.mean = metrics_module.Mean(name='metric_1')

  def call(self, inputs):
    self.add_metric(self.mean(x))
    self.add_metric(math_ops.reduce_sum(x), name='metric_2')
    return inputs

This method can also be called directly on a Functional Model during construction. In this case, any tensor passed to this Model must be symbolic and be able to be traced back to the model's Inputs. These metrics become part of the model's topology and are tracked when you save the model via save().

inputs = tf.keras.Input(shape=(10,))
x = tf.keras.layers.Dense(10)(inputs)
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1)(x)
model = tf.keras.Model(inputs, outputs)
model.add_metric(math_ops.reduce_sum(x), name='metric_1')
inputs = tf.keras.Input(shape=(10,))
x = tf.keras.layers.Dense(10)(inputs)
outputs = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1)(x)
model = tf.keras.Model(inputs, outputs)
model.add_metric(tf.keras.metrics.Mean()(x), name='metric_1')

Args
value Metric tensor.
name String metric name.
**kwargs Additional keyword arguments for backward compatibility. Accepted values: aggregation - When the value tensor provided is not the result of calling a keras.Metric instance, it will be aggregated by default using a keras.Metric.Mean.

build

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Creates the variables of the layer (optional, for subclass implementers).

This is a method that implementers of subclasses of Layer or Model can override if they need a state-creation step in-between layer instantiation and layer call.

This is typically used to create the weights of Layer subclasses.

Arguments
input_shape Instance of TensorShape, or list of instances of TensorShape if the layer expects a list of inputs (one instance per input).

compute_mask

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Computes an output mask tensor.

Arguments
inputs Tensor or list of tensors.
mask Tensor or list of tensors.

Returns
None or a tensor (or list of tensors, one per output tensor of the layer).

compute_output_shape

Computes the output shape of the layer.

If the layer has not been built, this method will call build on the layer. This assumes that the layer will later be used with inputs that match the input shape provided here.

Arguments
input_shape Shape tuple (tuple of integers) or list of shape tuples (one per output tensor of the layer). Shape tuples can include None for free dimensions, instead of an integer.

Returns
An input shape tuple.

count_params

Count the total number of scalars composing the weights.

Returns
An integer count.

Raises
ValueError if the layer isn't yet built (in which case its weights aren't yet defined).

deserialize_inner_layer_from_config

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Helper method that reconstruct the query and memory from the config.

In the get_config() method, the query and memory layer configs are serialized into dict for persistence, this method perform the reverse action to reconstruct the layer from the config.

Args
config dict, the configs that will be used to reconstruct the object.
custom_objects dict mapping class names (or function names) of custom (non-Keras) objects to class/functions.

Returns
config dict, the config with layer instance created, which is ready to be used as init parameters.

from_config

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Creates a layer from its config.

This method is the reverse of get_config, capable of instantiating the same layer from the config dictionary. It does not handle layer connectivity (handled by Network), nor weights (handled by set_weights).

Arguments
config A Python dictionary, typically the output of get_config.

Returns
A layer instance.

get_config

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Returns the config of the layer.

A layer config is a Python dictionary (serializable) containing the configuration of a layer. The same layer can be reinstantiated later (without its trained weights) from this configuration.

The config of a layer does not include connectivity information, nor the layer class name. These are handled by Network (one layer of abstraction above).

Returns
Python dictionary.

get_weights

Returns the current weights of the layer.

The weights of a layer represent the state of the layer. This function returns both trainable and non-trainable weight values associated with this layer as a list of Numpy arrays, which can in turn be used to load state into similarly parameterized layers.

For example, a Dense layer returns a list of two values-- per-output weights and the bias value. These can be used to set the weights of another Dense layer:

a = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1,
  kernel_initializer=tf.constant_initializer(1.))
a_out = a(tf.convert_to_tensor([[1., 2., 3.]]))
a.get_weights()
[array([[1.],
       [1.],
       [1.]], dtype=float32), array([0.], dtype=float32)]
b = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1,
  kernel_initializer=tf.constant_initializer(2.))
b_out = b(tf.convert_to_tensor([[10., 20., 30.]]))
b.get_weights()
[array([[2.],
       [2.],
       [2.]], dtype=float32), array([0.], dtype=float32)]
b.set_weights(a.get_weights())
b.get_weights()
[array([[1.],
       [1.],
       [1.]], dtype=float32), array([0.], dtype=float32)]

Returns
Weights values as a list of numpy arrays.

initial_alignments

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Creates the initial alignment values for the AttentionWrapper class.

This is important for AttentionMechanisms that use the previous alignment to calculate the alignment at the next time step (e.g. monotonic attention).

The default behavior is to return a tensor of all zeros.

Args
batch_size int32 scalar, the batch_size.
dtype The dtype.

Returns
A dtype tensor shaped [batch_size, alignments_size] (alignments_size is the values' max_time).

initial_state

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Creates the initial state values for the AttentionWrapper class.

This is important for AttentionMechanisms that use the previous alignment to calculate the alignment at the next time step (e.g. monotonic attention).

The default behavior is to return the same output as initial_alignments.

Args
batch_size int32 scalar, the batch_size.
dtype The dtype.

Returns
A structure of all-zero tensors with shapes as described by state_size.

set_weights

Sets the weights of the layer, from Numpy arrays.

The weights of a layer represent the state of the layer. This function sets the weight values from numpy arrays. The weight values should be passed in the order they are created by the layer. Note that the layer's weights must be instantiated before calling this function by calling the layer.

For example, a Dense layer returns a list of two values-- per-output weights and the bias value. These can be used to set the weights of another Dense layer:

a = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1,
  kernel_initializer=tf.constant_initializer(1.))
a_out = a(tf.convert_to_tensor([[1., 2., 3.]]))
a.get_weights()
[array([[1.],
       [1.],
       [1.]], dtype=float32), array([0.], dtype=float32)]
b = tf.keras.layers.Dense(1,
  kernel_initializer=tf.constant_initializer(2.))
b_out = b(tf.convert_to_tensor([[10., 20., 30.]]))
b.get_weights()
[array([[2.],
       [2.],
       [2.]], dtype=float32), array([0.], dtype=float32)]
b.set_weights(a.get_weights())
b.get_weights()
[array([[1.],
       [1.],
       [1.]], dtype=float32), array([0.], dtype=float32)]

Arguments
weights a list of Numpy arrays. The number of arrays and their shape must match number of the dimensions of the weights of the layer (i.e. it should match the output of get_weights).

Raises
ValueError If the provided weights list does not match the layer's specifications.

setup_memory

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Pre-process the memory before actually query the memory.

This should only be called once at the first invocation of call().

Args
memory The memory to query; usually the output of an RNN encoder. This tensor should be shaped [batch_size, max_time, ...]. memory_sequence_length (optional): Sequence lengths for the batch entries in memory. If provided, the memory tensor rows are masked with zeros for values past the respective sequence lengths.
memory_mask (Optional) The boolean tensor with shape [batch_size, max_time]. For any value equal to False, the corresponding value in memory should be ignored.

with_name_scope

Decorator to automatically enter the module name scope.

class MyModule(tf.Module):
  @tf.Module.with_name_scope
  def __call__(self, x):
    if not hasattr(self, 'w'):
      self.w = tf.Variable(tf.random.normal([x.shape[1], 3]))
    return tf.matmul(x, self.w)

Using the above module would produce tf.Variables and tf.Tensors whose names included the module name:

mod = MyModule()
mod(tf.ones([1, 2]))
<tf.Tensor: shape=(1, 3), dtype=float32, numpy=..., dtype=float32)>
mod.w
<tf.Variable 'my_module/Variable:0' shape=(2, 3) dtype=float32,
numpy=..., dtype=float32)>

Args
method The method to wrap.

Returns
The original method wrapped such that it enters the module's name scope.

__call__

View source

Preprocess the inputs before calling base_layer.__call__().

Note that there are situation here, one for setup memory, and one with actual query and state.

  1. When the memory has not been configured, we just pass all the param to baselayer.call_(), which will then invoke self.call() with proper inputs, which allows this class to setup memory.
  2. When the memory has already been setup, the input should contain query and state, and optionally processed memory. If the processed memory is not included in the input, we will have to append it to the inputs and give it to the baselayer.call(). The processed memory is the output of first invocation of self.call_(). If we don't add it here, then from keras perspective, the graph is disconnected since the output from previous call is never used.

Args
inputs the inputs tensors.
**kwargs dict, other keyeword arguments for the __call__()